Keeping your food safe while outing…

The summer has fully kicked in and trips to the beach, a picnic at your favorite park, and an overnight stay in a campsite sound so exhilarating!

Food Safety picnicIt is certain that food will be involved in any of these trips since we all need to eat. Perhaps your favorite grilled entree paired with vegetable skewers and fresh-squeezed lemonade over ice sound like a perfect culinary experience during an outing.  Wouldn’t you want to finish up this experience without gastrointestinal problems?

To protect you and your trip crew against food borne illnesses and keep a pleasantly healthy gastrointestinal system (mostly made up of your stomach, intestines, and trips to the WC…) when eating outdoors, follow these eight simple guidelines for preparing, transporting and serving your food safely – you can even print this page, take it with you and share it with your trip crew. This can be a teachable moment for your children, family members and friends. We all eat and handle food, so this info is worthwhile to everyone. Happy outing!

Eight Simple Food Safety Steps

  1. Keep everything clean. Always wash and dry your hands before handling food or cooking, and after using the restroom, touching your body, and handling raw animal foods. Make sure all utensils and dishes are cleaned with running water and soap when preparing foods and reusing them.
  2. Fresh fruits and vegetables. Unless they are packaged and labeled “ready-to-eat” or “washed,” rinse and dry them with running water before eating or packaging them. Brush fruits and vegetables with skin.
  3. Don’t cross-contaminate. Don’t let cooked food touch raw foods and keep raw meat, poultry and seafood away from foods that do not require cooking them to a specific internal temperature.
  4. Keep cold food cold (at or below 40°F) and hot food hot (at or above 140°F) during preparation and storing to prevent bacterial growth. A food thermometer comes in handy; make sure to sanitize it with alcohol before each use. Tip: carry coolers inside the cabin of the car as the trunk can get too warm, becoming the perfect environment for bacteria.
  5. Cook food thoroughly. Use a food thermometer to be sure food is cooked to a safe internal temperature – the table below from the FoodSafety.gov website shows food-specific cooking temperatures.
  6. Check for foreign objects in food. For example, body hair or bristles from a brush to clean the grill. Tip: tie your hair back or wear a cap when cooking.
  7. Store leftovers ASAP. Place them in a refrigerator or ice chest to keep them at or below 40°F. Discard food if it has been left out for over 2 hours or over 1 hour if the temperature is above 90°F, and if they have been stored for 2 days or more. Specific food storage times are found here.
  8. Reheating. When reheating cooked food, reheat to 165°F.
Category Food

Temperature (°F) 

Ground Meat & Meat Mixtures Beef, Pork, Veal, Lamb

160

Turkey, Chicken

165

Fresh Beef, Veal, Lamb Steaks, roasts, chops

145

Poultry Chicken & Turkey, whole, breasts, roasts, thighs, legs, wingsDuck & GooseStuffing (cooked alone or in bird)

165

Pork and Ham Fresh pork and ham (raw)

145

Precooked ham (to reheat)

140

Eggs & Egg Dishes Eggs

Cook until yolk & white are firm

Egg dishes

160

Leftovers & Casseroles Leftovers & casseroles

165

Seafood Fin Fish

145 or cook until flesh is opaque & separates easily with a fork.

Shrimp, lobster, and crabs

Cook until flesh is pearly & opaque.

Clams, oysters, and mussels

Cook until shells open during cooking.

Scallops

Cook until flesh is milky white or opaque & firm.

 

Blog Courtesy of Martha Mosqueda

 

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Tucson Medical Center | 5301 E. Grant Rd. | Tucson, AZ 85712 | (520) 327-5461
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