Screening and mammography myths – what’s your “normal?”

BDP36471We are continuing our weekly blog series with Dr. Michele Boyce Ley, TMC One’s new board-certified breast oncology surgeon and medical director of TMC’s Breast Health Program. Last week she shared with us highly valuable information about how to figure out if you’re really at high risk for breast cancer or not.

This week we’re focusing on how to sort out truths vs. myths when it comes to screening and mammography.

As women, we’re told to do our self-breast exam “when we pay our rent.” Or “on the same day every month as our birthday.” There are even apps to remind you. Most of us know we should do them. But the reality is, we don’t.

Are self-exams encouraged? And should you really be doing them? “Absolutely,” said Dr. Boyce Ley. “We want women to become really self-aware when it comes to their breast health. We want them to do monthly self-exams so that they become familiar with what their normal is. If they do regular checks and know what their breasts feel like, it’s easier to discover when something feels out of the ordinary. If you’re aware of it, you can monitor it and get in to see a breast specialist if necessary. When it comes to self-exams, it’s best to do it the first week after your menstrual cycle.”

Dr. Michele Boyce Ley Board-Certified, Breast Surgical Oncology Medical Director, TMC Breast Health Program

Dr. Michele Boyce Ley
Board-Certified, Breast Surgical Oncology
Medical Director, TMC Breast Health Program

Dr. Boyce Ley explained that there is chatter in the medical world that monthly self-exams may cause unnecessary imaging and biopsies. One of the many challenges, she explained, is that while there are a lot of risk factors we know about, there are also a lot of risk factors we don’t know about. It can be difficult to definitively decide that a 35-year-old, for example, should have a mammogram. “That’s when it’s appropriate for that patient to see a breast specialist,” she said. “If you’ve tried to figure out if you’re considered high risk or not, and you’re still unsure, or if you just need guidance to sort it all out, have a breast specialist help you,” she said. If a woman is identified as high risk, then imaging starts earlier.

▪ What about the risk of being exposed to so much radiation during a mammogram?

It may be recommended that younger people who are identified as high risk get mammograms every other year instead of annually at first. Or perhaps your doctor wants to combine a mammogram with an MRI. “Generally, radiation risks aren’t any higher than they were with regular film screen mammograms from 15 years ago,” said Dr. Boyce Ley. “MRI is a test without any radiation.”

▪ There are 2D and 3D mammograms. How do I figure out which kind I need?

Film screen mammography is a thing of the past. These days, all mammography is done digitally. A 2D, or standard mammogram, captures all of the layers of the breast tissue stacked on top of each other. During a 3D mammogram, the x-ray camera rotates around the breast, getting a picture of multiple layers of the breast. Those layers can then be separated out for an even more precise view. For a majority of patients, standard digital mammography is still very good. Doctors have found, however, that for all patients, especially those with dense breasts, 3D mammography allows them to do fewer call backs. That means that there is a smaller chance that you’d have to be called back in for a follow-up mammogram or ultrasound. “The detection rate for cancer is higher with 3D mammography, as it allows us to find more small cancers,” explained Dr. Boyce Ley. “The downside is it can cost more.”

At TMC’s Breast Center, both 2D and 3D mammography is performed. If you’re considering a 3D mammogram, be sure to check with your insurance first to see what it covers.

▪ I have breast implants. Do I have to do anything differently?

No. The screening recommendations are the same. Dr. Boyce Ley said that implants can distort the breast tissue. In some cases, implants can make it easier to find a lump by feeling the breast tissue during a monthly self-exam. On the flipside, in some cases, it may make it harder to find a lump by imaging since the breast tissue is being pushed around by the implant. It can be difficult to visualize all the breast tissue since the implant often distorts it.

▪ Does where I get screened matter?

Yes, according to Dr. Boyce Ley. Before you schedule your mammogram, do your research. Ask if your scan is going to be reviewed by a breast imaging specialist or radiologist with a specific focus who is able to give you an accurate interpretation. “You want to have your breast imaging read by someone who almost exclusively does mammographic imaging,” said Dr. Boyce Ley. “There are so many changes in technology and what we learn about the breast. It’s important to have someone who is highly experienced.”

Dr. Boyce Ley recommends asking a few questions when you call to schedule your appointment. Ask things like, “Can you tell me about your radiologist? Can I look them up online? Are they fellowship trained in breast imaging or are they a general radiologist? What percentage of their time do they read mammograms?”

At TMC’s Breast Center, all of our radiologists are trained as general radiologists and then receive specialized training in breast imaging. Additionally, our lead radiologist, Dr. Matthew Bell, as well as Dr. Shayna Klein are both fellowship trained in breast imaging. All of our radiologists must keep their training current, so you can be confident that if you get a mammogram at TMC, it’s being read by clinicians who are specially trained in reading mammograms.

Dr. Boyce Ley is accepting new patients!
She is located at 2625 N. Craycroft Rd #201.
Call (520) 324-BRST (2778) to make an appointment.

To schedule a mammogram, call (520) 324-2075.

Spread the word about when to have your first screening mammogram and the FREE screening mammograms for uninsured women by entering our TMC for Women photo contest. Snap a picture of you and your BFF and enter for a chance at a fabulous prize.   http://woobox.com/chcztiPhotoContestBFF

Comments

  1. Marcella Osterkamp says:

    I was impressed by the new machine but not impressed to find that my insurance didn’t pay 100% of my mammogram. I was not as impressed with the cost as I was with the new mammogram experience and the nice lady that did my mammogram.

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