Breast cancer – what men need to know

shutterstock_325524227October is awesome! The baseball and football seasons are both thumpin’. The NFL just got into gear, and MLB is ramping up for the World Series. We’re talking Heath Miller, Deangelo Williams, Matt Kemp, Drew Brees, Richard Sherman, Anthony Rizzo and more! OK, where’s the remote and the chips?!

October is also awesome because it is Breast Health Awareness Month, and the athletes mentioned above are all taking part in supporting it. Guys, this should remind us all that men have a part in supporting breast health awareness.

“Hold up! I don’t have to worry about breast cancer; I’m a dude.” If that is your attitude, then you are wrong in two ways.

One: Men can get breast cancer. More than 2500 men are diagnosed with breast cancer every year. Two:  Breast cancer doesn’t affect just one person, it affects everyone around her. Whether it’s your mom, sister, friend, cousin, wife or daughter, their health and wellbeing are a part of your life. How serious could this be? Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women and a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women.

“Got it; I’ll get out my pink t-shirt and pull on a pink bracelet. Done.” That’s great bro, but we can take the support up a notch.

No need to research for weeks or try to mansplain every detail. Knowing the basics and being able to thoughtfully answer some questions will help support her in making decisions about her own health. And it shows we care – because we do.

Here are a few things guys should know about breast cancer:

  • Early detection can save lives. Getting a regular mammogram is the best way to detect cancer early. At what age, and how often should a woman get a mammogram? Every woman is unique and should assess her risk and discuss preventative measures with her doctor.
  • Mammogram: OK, everybody has probably heard this term, but what it is exactly? It is an x-ray of the breast. There have been a lot of advancements in mammography. Digital and 3D mammography create clearer images for better detection. Just so ya’ know fellas, the breast has to be compressed and it isn’t fun.
  • Symptoms: Breast cancer has many symptoms other than a lump. Itching, redness, swelling, dimpling, clear or bloody discharge can all be symptoms of breast cancer. If a woman is experiencing these symptoms, she should consult her doctor.
  • There is more than one type. There are many forms of breast cancer, and there are varied treatments depending on the type of cancer and the age of the patient.
  • There is hope: There has been a dramatic increase in breast cancer survivability rates in the past 40 years. New tests, targeted drugs and early detection are making a difference. While one in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer, the five-year breast cancer survival rate is 90 percent, up from 75 percent in 1975.

Men are becoming more knowledgeable and involved in breast cancer awareness – and that rocks! We care and we want to be supportive.

The information is out there and easy to access. So guys, let’s browse these links and get the information that will help us be supportive this month, and the whole year-round.

Additional resources:

Susan G. Komen

Susan G. Komen Arizona

National Breast Cancer Foundation, Inc.

Breastcancer.org

Breast Cancer Research Foundation

American Breast Cancer Foundation

Foundation for Women’s Cancer

American Cancer Society

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

If you have any concerns or questions, please feel free to contact the TMC Breast Center at (520) 324-1286 or email breast.navigator@tmcaz.com.

breast-center

 

Medical insurance covers annual mammography screening as a preventative service, and grant funds allow TMC to offer mammograms for uninsured women age 40 and over. To make an appointment, call (520) 324-2075.

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Tucson Medical Center | 5301 E. Grant Rd. | Tucson, AZ 85712 | (520) 327-5461
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