Help celebrate Physical Therapy month throughout October

EmilyBurdettePhysical therapists work hard to help patients improve their range of motion, strength and flexibility so they can lead their most active lives and obtain better outcomes.

National Physical Therapy month is held each October and Tucson Medical Center would like to take this time to recognize the impact of our therapists. A big thank you is in order for the 14 physical therapists and six physical therapy assistants in adult acute therapies, as well as the 11 therapists in pediatric therapies.

It’s also an opportunity to highlight the achievement of those therapists that have worked towards their advanced certifications.

According to the American Board of Physical Therapy Specialists, certification was established to:

  • recognize physical therapists with advanced clinical knowledge, experience, and skills in a special area of practice
  • assist consumers and health care community in identifying physical therapists who have advanced skills
  • address a specific area of patient need

Certification takes a great deal of work: Therapists must have extensive background in their specialty area including direct clinical hours and passing a board exam.  In order to maintain the certification, therapists must retake the exam and participate in professional development activities including service to the profession, teaching, and participation in research studies.

We caught up with Emily Burdette, who recently earned her certification, to learn more about the effort.

Why did you pursue this certification?

I wanted to pursue the designation of board-certified clinical specialist in pediatric physical therapy in order to demonstrate my commitment to the profession of pediatric physical therapy as well as my patients. I wanted to set myself apart as a clinician who is considered to have advanced clinical skills in pediatric physical therapy.

I pursued this certification as a commitment to further the profession of pediatric physical therapy. In order to become re-certified as a pediatric certified specialist, I must be active in the profession of pediatric physical therapy by attending continuing education courses, teaching physical therapy students during their clinical internships, participating in research projects, and becoming a mentor to other pediatric physical therapists.

Lastly, I wanted to pursue this certification to continue my commitment for life-long learning as a pediatric physical therapist. It is a personal commitment of mine as well as the other therapists working at Tucson Medical Center Pediatric Therapies to stay as up-to-date as possible on all research regarding the treatment of children. We all pride ourselves on the emphasis Tucson Medical Center Pediatric Therapies has on evidence-based practice.

How rigorous was the process? 

I studied every day for nine months for about 2-3 hours per day. I was busy reviewing various diagnoses that are seen by pediatric physical therapists in different areas of practice. I also reviewed research papers from the Pediatric Physical Therapy Journal and Physical Therapy Journal and took continuing education courses for diagnoses that I am not as familiar with. The actual test for certification was 6 hours long and 200 questions.

Was it worth it? 

It was worth the sacrifice so that I could provide the best evidence-based care to my patients. It helped me to review treatment of pediatric diagnoses I am familiar with as well as learn about the treatment of diagnoses I am not as familiar with. I believe that all of the studying and reviewing of research articles has made me a better, more knowledgeable pediatric physical therapist!​

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Tucson Medical Center | 5301 E. Grant Road | Tucson, Arizona 85712 | (520) 327-5461
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