Stay in optimum health, prevent metabolic syndrome

Tips from Endocrinologist Dr. Pati on how to prevent metabolic syndrome

Are you at risk for developing metabolic syndrome?

Metabolic syndrome, which often carries no signs or symptoms, is associated with several obesity related disorders including fatty liver and cirrhosis, kidney disease, polycystic ovarian syndrome, and obstructive sleep apnea. It places those affected by the syndrome at increased risk of developing diabetes and heart disease – and they never even know they have it!

Dr. Divya Reddy Pati, endocrinologist with TMCOne, answers our questions about this metabolic syndrome.

Tell me more. What is metabolic syndrome?

Metabolic syndrome, also known as insulin resistance syndrome or syndrome x, is a group of factors that increase the risk of developing diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps move blood sugar into the cell where it is used for energy. Obesity causes insulin resistance, which leads to high blood glucose.

How is it diagnosed?

A physician who specializes in endocrinology can prescribe the medical tests that diagnose metabolic syndrome, which is determined by a presence of three of the following:

  • Abdominal obesity, defined as a waist circumference in men ≥102 cm (40 in) and in women ≥88 cm (35 in)
  • Serum triglycerides ≥150 mg/dL or drug treatment for elevated triglycerides
  • Serum HDL cholesterol <40 mg/dL in men and <50 mg/dL in women or drug treatment for low HDL cholesterol
  • Blood pressure ≥130/85 mmHg or drug treatment for elevated blood pressure
  • Fasting plasma glucose ≥100 mg/dL or drug treatment for elevated blood glucose

What is the prevalence of metabolic syndrome?

Metabolic syndrome is more common in African-Americans, Asians, Hispanics and Native Americans. Chances also increase with age, as well as with lack of physical activity.

What is the treatment?

Treatment of metabolic syndrome is aggressive lifestyle modification focused on weight loss and increase in physical activity. Weight reduction is optimally achieved by diet, exercise and pharmacological treatment if needed. Medications are used to treat risk factors such as high blood pressure, glucose and lipids.

What do you suggest we do to stay in optimum health?

It is important to visit your primary care physician regularly and address an endocrinology specialist if metabolic syndrome is encountered. Maintaining a healthy diet and an exercise plan (approved by your provider) is an excellent way of avoiding metabolic syndrome and maintaining optimum health.

pati1Dr. Divya Reddy Pati is an endocrinologist practicing with TMCOne. She diagnoses and treats diabetes, thyroid problems, calcium disorders, osteoporosis, pituitary, adrenal and other hormonal disorders.

 

A version of this interview was first posted on December 21, 2016

 

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