“Diabetes doesn’t change who I am”

Brody Coomler shares his insights on living with type 1 diabetesTwelve year-old Brody Coomler refuses to let type 1 diabetes define him – he explains how a seventh grader balances a full schedule with the challenges of diabetes.  

He’s an avid basketball player, he’s a hip-hop dancer, he plays the tuba and he’s a gamer. Brody is an active and enthusiastic tween who doesn’t let diabetes keep him from doing the things he’s passionate about.

At four, Brody and his family learned his pancreas was creating little to no insulin – the hormone that regulates blood sugar. He was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, a chronic and life-long condition that causes blood sugar to spike and fall unexpectedly.

Surging blood sugar levels are far more than a nuisance, they can lead to serious medical complications and death if not properly managed through insulin therapy.

Managing type 1 diabetes can be demanding, especially for a young person. During National Diabetes Awareness Month, Brody shares how monitoring diabetes is part of his life, but hasn’t taken it over.

What does having type 1 diabetes mean to you?

Diabetes doesn’t change who I am. But it is a disease that I have to manage on a constant basis in order to stay safe.

Do you have to check your blood sugar all the time?

Yes, I do! I have to check before meals and before bed. If I’m feeling like my blood sugar is too high or if I’m feeling like my blood sugar is too low I have to test. I am very active and so I have to test before I play any sports or any dancing. Monitoring my blood sugar is a big part of having diabetes.

Do you have a special diet?

No, I don’t have a special diet. But like anyone I have to watch what I eat. I count my carbohydrates so that I can dose my insulin based on what I’m eating.

Does diabetes ever get in the way of sports or hobbies?

It definitely does. When I have low blood sugar I have to sit out of a sport or not be able to participate. I have to make sure that my blood sugars are in good range so that not only am I safe but also so that I can perform.

What do you want people to know about having type 1 diabetes?

Don’t let type one diabetes stop you from doing anything!

How would things be different for you if there was a cure?

I don’t let diabetes hold me back, but I would definitely be more free from having to test my blood sugar, put on new insulin pump sites or wear a continuous glucose monitor – things like that. I wouldn’t get sick as much as I get sick now. My mom wouldn’t call me as much.

What would you tell a friend who just found out they have type 1 diabetes?

I would suggest that they make other friends who have type 1 diabetes so that they can help one another. My friends with diabetes are a good support to me. You can expect the unexpected. You get to have some fun times and meet people that you didn’t think that you would otherwise meet.

For more information about type 1 diabetes and how you can support research for a cure, visit the JDRF website or call (800) 533-CURE (2873).

TMCOne provides adult and pediatric endocrinology services – for more call (520) 324-4900.

 

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