Hip Hop dancing with Type 1 – Brody’s got this!

Brody Coomler shares his insights on living with type 1 diabetesHip hop dancing can be tough for anyone, but not for Brody – a seventh-grader living with the challenges of Type 1 diabetes.

“Diabetes doesn’t change who I am,” said twelve-year-old Brody. “But it is a disease that I have to manage on a constant basis in order to stay safe.”

The moves? Brody’s practiced for years. The look? He’s got it on lock. The music? Please. So what happens when his insulin pump comes out during a performance? Brody’s got this.

Brody doesn’t miss a single beat – incorporating the pump wires into his routine.

The situation is a metaphor for Brody’s life. When Type 1 diabetes unexpectedly surfaced – he didn’t let it affect his dance, and Brody doesn’t let Type 1 stop him from playing basketball, gaming, learning to play the tuba or experiencing all life’s got to offer.

But Brody says it much better. “Don’t let type one diabetes stop you from doing anything!”

At four, Brody and his family learned his pancreas was creating little to no insulin – the hormone that regulates blood sugar. He was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, a chronic and life-long condition that causes blood sugar to spike and fall unexpectedly.

Surging blood sugar levels are far more than a nuisance, they can lead to serious medical complications and death if not properly managed through insulin therapy.

“I have to check [my blood sugar] before meals and before bed,” Brody explained. “If I’m feeling like my blood sugar is too high or if I’m feeling like my blood sugar is too low I have to test. I am very active and so I have to test before I play any sports or any dancing. Monitoring my blood sugar is a big part of having diabetes.”

Even though this brave young-man doesn’t let Type 1 slow him down, he admits his life would be different if there was a cure.

“I would definitely be free from having to test my blood sugar, put on new insulin pump sites or wear a continuous glucose monitor – things like that,” Brody said. “I wouldn’t get sick as much as I get sick now. My mom wouldn’t call me as much.”

You can help kids like Brody by supporting Type 1 research through events like the JDRF Sip, Savor & Celebrate being held Friday, March 23 at La Encantada. Festivities start at 6 p.m. – enjoy live music, fantastic food and drink, and help move research closer to a cure.

Purchase tickets at www.celebratejdrf.com or call (520) 203-8084.

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