From bariatric surgery to instructor of “Insanity” workout

IMG_0607When Marni Gould topped out at 248 pounds, it became evident she needed to make a change.

Dance and exercise had been her passion since high school – and although she had remained active even through her weight struggles, she was finding more and more she couldn’t do it anymore.

At 35, the middle school math teacher was grappling with sky-high blood pressure and a resting heart rate of more than 100 beats per minute. Her knees hurt from carrying too much weight for her frame, and her ankle rolled far too often. She had tried a number of diets and none of them seemed to work.

“I knew I needed help with food. I never knew how to properly eat,” she said, noting cheeseburgers were a particular weakness.

Gould’s two sisters each had had bariatric surgery and after seeing the results, she decided to learn more. After going through a six-month process of medically-supervised weight loss, she still had not lost enough weight. She had the surgery April 2016 and was back at work in two weeks. She almost immediately went back to the gym, doing serious modifications to ease herself back into being active and avoiding core exercises at first to give herself time to heal.

Gould also was strict that first year in particular with her diet – lots of protein shakes and thoughtful meal choices, with PowerCrunch bars to satisfy sweet-tooth cravings. “This just let me reset. Now I know I can eat the right things in balance with the amount of activity I do,” she said.

While Gould’s one sister took up running, Gould gravitated more toward strength.

IMG_5384Four months after her surgery, she started a high-intensity endurance workout called Insanity Live. She modified everything and kept plugging away. She learned to love it.

In a year, her body fat had dropped from 48 percent to 25 percent. By 18 months, she had lost her 100-pound goal. At 138 pounds, she went from a size 22 to a 6/8.

When her instructor moved, Gould couldn’t imagine a Saturday without Insanity Live. She decided to teach it. “At the training, they said, ‘You don’t have to be the best at the moves. You just have to be the most motivating.’ That stuck with me.”

While some instructors bark orders and push students to work at top capacity, Gould remembers the importance of pacing herself. “I really want to pull in people who are scared of it – it’s called Insanity for a reason. I want them in there so they can see how much they change over time. When you start losing and toning, it helps you stay motivated and keep going.”

Gould is so passionate about sharing her transformation, that she regularly attends the TMC Bariatric Support group and manages a Facebook group for local patients, as well as another accountability group for those who need more regular check-ins. “I love inspiring others. I remember early on when I was frustrated with the pace of my weight loss, someone told me, ‘You’re on a trajectory.’ And that changed everything. It’s not about the Right Now. It’s about progress, not perfection.”

“I just want to help others. I feel like I’ve been given this gift – and what good is this gift to me if I am not spreading it and using it to assist others?”

Comments

  1. Marni is a hugh motivator for TMC bariatric support group. She is the driving force that has made this group grow. Sorry to see Rachel leave leading the group she was always supportive, motivating and would bring interesting speakers .

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