Why we promote rooming-in

For mom and baby’s health

Rooming in

Not very long ago family and visitors would clamor for prime viewing spots outside the nursery window to see their newborn swaddled, beyond reach and comforting touch. No longer, as hospitals moved from open wards to private rooms,  the practice of rooming-in has become common place. At TMC for Women, rooming-in is the norm, but we’re still asked occasionally, by moms and families, about baby spending time in the nursery.

Why we promote rooming-in

The practice of taking baby to the nursery to ‘give mom a break’or a good night’s sleep might seem logical, but research studies have shown that sleep patterns and breastfeeding are often better established when baby stays with mom and mom with support learns her child’s cues. For this reason we promote 24-hour rooming-in for new moms.

Mom to near 2 year old Felix, Cindy shares her experience rooming-in at TMC for Women,

“I was going to the El Rio Birth Center and wanted to have a natural -birth experience, but that wasn’t in the cards for me. At 41 weeks, it was time to go to the hospital. I was at TMC for two days before Felix was born via C-section. He was 10.5 lbs and a bit of a celebrity for the short time I was there. There hadn’t been such a big baby born in quite a while. After the C-section, our midwife gave Felix to me right away.”

Placed on Cindy’s chest immediately, Felix stayed with mom except for testing and a short time when Cindy was attended to following the C-section.

“The nurses at TMC were very kind, supportive and respectful of my need to have Felix with me at all times. I was there after the surgery for 3 days. It was amazing to have that little guy close to me. I wouldn’t have traded that experience for anything in the world.”

What is the newborn nursery for?

Our newborn nursery is reserved for only those babies who need intensive observation or are having problems that prevent them from staying in their mother’s room.

Moms are encouraged to always keep their baby with them. Mom’s partner or a support person is welcome to stay overnight to help them with the baby, as they bond and get to know one another.

Why rooming-in is important

• Rooming-in promotes successful breastfeeding
• Keeping your baby with you at all times helps both of you sleep better and establish sleep wake cycles. There are also physiological benefits in regulating baby’s blood glucose levels, temperature, and respiratory rate.
• The safest place for the baby is with the parent
• Being together strengthens your bond – the more time you spend together,the better you will know each other
• You will learn your baby’s cues, and the baby will be calmer hearing your familiar voice and your heartbeat
• You will feel more confident in your ability to care for the baby when you go home from the hospital

Resources


Keefe, MR. Comparison of neonatal nighttime sleep-wake patterns in nursery versus rooming-in environments. Nurs Res. 1987 May-Jun;36(3):140-4. [Accessed6-6-2014]

Koskinen, KS.,  AhoAL, Hannula L, Kaunonen M, Maternity hospital practices and breast feeding self-efficacy in Finnish primiparous and multiparous women during the immediate postpartum period. .Midwifery 2014 Apr;30(4):464-70. doi: 10.1016/j.midw.2013.05.003.Epub 2013 Jun 13. [Accessed 6-6-2014]

Comments

  1. Cecilia R says:

    This place i am very disappointed in , I had my baby via c section and these people came to me at recovery room told me i had drugs in my system which was a lie i said prove it again they did another test and confirmed last test which indicated a mistake on there end . My experience with my child was devastating especially after cps came in and interviewed me for something i never did which was embarrassing . i am receiving care there now and very hesitant towards them . I guarantee these people will be in court and the judge will know all the mistakes they made and the pain and suffering i endured My name is Cecilia R. See you soon !!!

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Tucson Medical Center | 5301 E. Grant Road | Tucson, Arizona 85712 | (520) 327-5461
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