“Diabetes doesn’t change who I am”

Brody Coomler shares his insights on living with type 1 diabetesTwelve year-old Brody Coomler refuses to let type 1 diabetes define him – he explains how a seventh grader balances a full schedule with the challenges of diabetes.  

He’s an avid basketball player, he’s a hip-hop dancer, he plays the tuba and he’s a gamer. Brody is an active and enthusiastic tween who doesn’t let diabetes keep him from doing the things he’s passionate about.

At four, Brody and his family learned his pancreas was creating little to no insulin – the hormone that regulates blood sugar. He was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, a chronic and life-long condition that causes blood sugar to spike and fall unexpectedly.

Surging blood sugar levels are far more than a nuisance, they can lead to serious medical complications and death if not properly managed through insulin therapy.

Managing type 1 diabetes can be demanding, especially for a young person. During National Diabetes Awareness Month, Brody shares how monitoring diabetes is part of his life, but hasn’t taken it over.

What does having type 1 diabetes mean to you?

Diabetes doesn’t change who I am. But it is a disease that I have to manage on a constant basis in order to stay safe.

Do you have to check your blood sugar all the time?

Yes, I do! I have to check before meals and before bed. If I’m feeling like my blood sugar is too high or if I’m feeling like my blood sugar is too low I have to test. I am very active and so I have to test before I play any sports or any dancing. Monitoring my blood sugar is a big part of having diabetes.

Do you have a special diet?

No, I don’t have a special diet. But like anyone I have to watch what I eat. I count my carbohydrates so that I can dose my insulin based on what I’m eating.

Does diabetes ever get in the way of sports or hobbies?

It definitely does. When I have low blood sugar I have to sit out of a sport or not be able to participate. I have to make sure that my blood sugars are in good range so that not only am I safe but also so that I can perform.

What do you want people to know about having type 1 diabetes?

Don’t let type one diabetes stop you from doing anything!

How would things be different for you if there was a cure?

I don’t let diabetes hold me back, but I would definitely be more free from having to test my blood sugar, put on new insulin pump sites or wear a continuous glucose monitor – things like that. I wouldn’t get sick as much as I get sick now. My mom wouldn’t call me as much.

What would you tell a friend who just found out they have type 1 diabetes?

I would suggest that they make other friends who have type 1 diabetes so that they can help one another. My friends with diabetes are a good support to me. You can expect the unexpected. You get to have some fun times and meet people that you didn’t think that you would otherwise meet.

For more information about type 1 diabetes and how you can support research for a cure, visit the JDRF website or call (800) 533-CURE (2873).

TMCOne provides adult and pediatric endocrinology services – for more call (520) 324-4900.

 

One foot at a time – Newborn screening

Electine Orido RN and Baby Cash

A quick pin prick to the heel of the foot, a small cry, a few drops of blood on card and you and your baby have taken an important step in keeping your child healthy – newborn screening.

Here in Arizona the newborn screening looks for 31 core disorders. In addition, we conduct a screening for hearing loss , for critical congenital heart defects and for jaundice. The list continues to expand as medical understanding grows.

Find out more about the Arizona Newborn Screening Panel

In July 2017, the State of Arizona Health Department added severe combined immunodeficiency, or SCID, to the list of conditions screened. While you may never have heard of SCID, a rare disorder affecting about one in 50,000 to 100,000 babies in the United States, you may have heard of the “Boy in the Bubble.” A young boy, David Vetter, brought this disease to notice when he survived for 12 years living in a plastic enclosure that excluded the everyday germs that generally kill affected infants in the first year of life. Generally, infants appear healthy at birth, but the lack of a functioning immune system makes them vulnerable to even everyday germs. Today, survival rates for children affected by SCID are much higher due to improved screening and treatment. If an infant receives a bone or cord blood transplant in the first three and half months of life prior to active infections, the survival rate can be as high as 94 percent.

But my baby looks healthy … Why every newborn needs newborn screening

We screen all babies because ALL babies are at risk, even if they look healthy. Most babies who are identified through screening have no family history of a disorder. The sooner a disorder is identified the quicker treatment can begin, which can prevent disability and even death.

What is involved in newborn screening?

Kassandra and baby Cash

1. Blood Test

At about 24 hours after birth, we start newborn screening with what is often called the heel-stick test.

Your baby’s heel will be cleaned and warmed. A quick pin prick allows five drops, yes just five drops, from your baby’s heel to be dropped onto a card with special filter paper to absorb the blood.

Once your baby’s details and your contact information are collected on the card it is sent off to the Arizona State Laboratory for testing.

Your child’s healthcare provider will be informed of normal or abnormal results. Be sure to ask your child’s provider for the test results if they do not volunteer them.

2. Pulse Oximetry

By using a sensor to detect low oxygen levels in the blood, we can identify babies who may have severe heart defects known as critical congenital heart disease. The pulse oximetry test is quick, easy and painless. We usually perform this screening test about 24 hours after birth. If a newborn’s oxygen level is below normal, your baby may need to have an ultrasound of the heart (echocardiogram). Unfortunately, the pulse oximetry screening is limited in that it won’t find all heart conditions.

3. Bilirubinometer

We assess all babies for jaundice using a special light meter, which calculates the level of bilirubin by analyzing how the light reflects off the skin. Because bilirubin levels, which cause the yellowing of the skin, peak between the second and fourth day after birth, your newborn’s health care provider should check for jaundice after release from the hospital. If jaundice is suspected, the level of bilirubin in the blood will be assessed too.

4. Newborn hearing screening

This is a simple, non-invasive hearing screening. If your baby appears to have a hearing issue during the initial screening the baby will be referred for auditory brainstem response and otoacoustic emissions testing. Your baby will be asleep during the ABR testing, and if the infant sleeps well, we usually give the results of the testing immediately following the test.

Whether you deliver with a midwife or obstetrician at TMC for Women we will take care of these critical newborn screenings. To find out more about our maternity services check out the free maternity services tour.

Find out more: FREE maternity services tour.

Halloween Safety Tips from Jessica Mitchell, Safe Kids Pima County

I love celebrating Halloween with my family, but I must admit I feel like I’m holding my breath all evening. Like many Tucson neighborhoods, ours has few street lights and on Oct. 31, kids are EVERYWHERE, often in dark costumes, often zigzagging across the roads to trick or treat. It’s a safety nightmare! Did you know that children are more than twice as likely to be hit by a car and killed on Halloween than on any other day of the year?

We try to watch where we are going, watch where our little ones are and watch for cars all at the same time. It can be really tough. I give my kids glow sticks to help them be seen by others, including drivers of cars. An added bonus, they think glow sticks are the coolest things ever!

What can you do to make Halloween safer this year for your children?

  1. When selecting a costume make sure it is the right size to prevent trips and falls.
  2. Decorate costumes and bags with reflective tape or stickers and, if possible, choose light colors.
  3. Since masks can sometimes obstruct a child’s vision, try nontoxic face paint and makeup whenever possible.
  4. Have kids use glow sticks or flashlights to help them see and be seen by drivers.
  5. Children under the age of 12 should not be alone at night without adult supervision. If kids are mature enough to be out without supervision, remind them to stick to familiar areas that are well lit and trick-or-treat in groups.
  6. Popular trick-or-treating hours are 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. so be especially alert for kids during those hours.

Plan ahead and keep your little ghouls and goblins safe and sound this Halloween,

Jessica

Jessica Mitchell is the Safe Kids Pima County program coordinator. Safe Kids Pima County is a network of organizations whose mission is to prevent accidental childhood injury, a leading killer of children aged 19 and under. Spearheaded by Tucson Medical Center, the local coalition is part of Safe Kids Worldwide, a global network of more than 600 coalitions in 23 countries bringing together health and safety experts, educators, corporations, foundations, governments and volunteers to educate and protect families.

These halloween revelers need a few glow sticks and then theyll really be shining.

Walk this way – Walk to School

Safe Kids Pima County and FedEx volunteers will join students from Whitmore Elementary and around the county to celebrate International Walk to School Day on October 4. International Walk to School Day raises community awareness about walking safety and promoting healthy behavior.

Did you know unintentional pedestrian injuries are the fifth leading cause of injury-related death in the United States for children ages 5 to 19? Teenagers are now at greatest risk with a death rate twice that of younger children and account for half of all child pedestrian deaths.

Whether or not your child’s school is participating, Jessica Mitchell, Safe Kids Pima County program coordinator, provides these suggestions for parents:

Teaching kids how to walk safely:

  1. Teach kids at an early age to look left, right and left again before crossing the street. Then remind them to continue looking until safely across. Teach them to never run or dart out into the street or cross between parked cars.
  2. Teach kids to put phones, headphones and devices down when crossing the street. It is particularly important to reinforce this message with teenagers. Parents, let your actions speak as loudly as your words.
  3. Encourage your children to be aware of others who may be distracted and speak up when they see someone who is in danger.
  4. It’s always best to walk on sidewalks or paths and cross at street corners, using traffic signals and crosswalks. If there are no sidewalks, walk facing traffic as far to the left as possible.
  5. Children under 10 need to cross the street with an adult. Every child is different, but developmentally, most kids are unable to judge the speed and distance of oncoming cars until age 10.
  6. Remind kids to make eye contact with drivers before crossing in front of them and to watch out for cars that are turning or backing up.
  7. It’s always best to walk on sidewalks or paths. If there are no sidewalks, walk facing traffic as far to the left as possible.
  8. Cross streets at corners, using traffic signals and crosswalks. Most injuries happen mid-block or someplace other than intersections.

As kids get older, they’re anxious for a little more freedom when walking to school or playing outside. But this is also a time when parents need to stress the importance of the little things big kids should do to stay safe.

Remember you are your child’s first role model. Lead by example:

  1. Be a good role model. Set a good example by putting your phone, headphones and devices down when walking around cars.
  2. When driving, put cell phones and other distractions in the back seat or out of sight until your final destination.
  3. Be especially alert and slow down when driving in residential neighborhoods and school zones. Be on the lookout for bikers, walkers or runners who may be distracted or may step into the street unexpectedly.
  4. Give pedestrians the right of way and look both ways when making a turn to spot any bikers, walkers or runners who may not be immediately visible.

For more resources to help keep your family safe
visit our website.

 

Dr. Patel returns to Tucson, providing pediatric endocrinology at TMCOne

Patel C PhotoDr. Chetanbabu Patel returned to Tucson in June and joined the TMCOne location on 2380 N. Ferguson, across the street from the TMC main campus.

While there are many great reasons for moving to Tucson, Dr. Patel summed it with just one. “The best care for the children we are treating,” he said. “This was a unique opportunity to be a part of a comprehensive program involving specially trained staff who communicates frequently and openly with families – that’s why I chose TMCOne.”

Dr. Patel and his team provide care for children ages 0 to 18 who are experiencing a wide range of endocrine related illnesses, including diabetes, thyroid disorders, adrenal and pituitary disorders, metabolic challenges, and much more.

“Chronic endocrine issues are complex and require a team working together to best help children achieve strong health,” the doctor explained. The team involves the coordinated efforts of specialists at the TMCOne clinic and Tucson Medical Center. The specialists include clinical dieticians, social workers, certified diabetic educators and several others.

Why the certified educators? “The importance of communication cannot be overstated – we want parents to feel comfortable and confident working with us because they are the most important part of the treatment team.”

Peds Endocrinology Care Flyer JPEGEach endocrine challenge is as unique as each human body and what works for one child may not work for another, which can frustrate parents and the patient. Dr. Patel says empathy is an important part of the care provided at his clinic.

“I try and place myself in the parent’s shoes, and understand what is happening with respect to the family dynamics as well as with happening with that particular child. I give them my undivided attention and spend enough time so that they understand why I want them to get labs or to consider one of the treatment options.”

Dr. Patel has dedicated his career to learning as much as possible about pediatric endocrine illness, and he is a devoted advocate for children and their families.

“I always dreamed of becoming a doctor to help others,” he said. “I enjoy working with the parents as well as the babies and teenagers to help them achieve optimum health.”

In addition to his medical practice, Dr. Patel has held many respected positions, including director of diabetes education at the Steele Research Center, chief of pediatric endocrinology at Texas Tech University and assistant professor of pediatric endocrinology at the University of Arizona.

His immediate and extended family also reside in Arizona, and Dr. Patel has always felt that Tucson is his home. While basketball, tennis and reading are his favorite hobbies, he most enjoys spending time with his family.

Dr. Patel is currently accepting new patients. Please call (520) 324-1010 to schedule.

 

 

Temps are rising and the pool is beckoning – do you know your water safety?

Pool Safety 3Is it hot enough yet? With Tucson temperatures exceeding 115 degrees for three straight days, many families will be heading for the pool this weekend.

It’s no surprise why swimming is a summer favorite. Parents get a chance to cool-off, kids max out on fun and families make memories.

With the summertime exuberance of visiting, splashing and playing, it can be easy for all to forget important safety rules. This is serious because Arizona has the second highest number of child drownings in the United States.

Child drowning is tragic but preventable. Safe Kids Pima County Coordinator Jessica Mitchell works with community partners to provide helpful tips and education to prevent childhood drowning. She provided us important water safety standards every
parent should know.

It’s as easy as ABC

A = Adult supervision B = Barriers around pools, spas and hot tubs C = Coast Guard approved life vest and life-saving CPR classes

My kids love playing in the pool – what are the things to watch out for?

  • Active supervision is a must. Provide active supervision without any distractions – even if other adults are present and many kids are in the pool. They call drowning the “silent killer” because a drowning child can’t call for help.
  • Infants and toddlers should stay within an arm’s reach of an adult.
  • Don’t rely on swimming aids such as water wings and pool noodles. They are fun, but may not prevent drowning.
  • When finished, remove all toys from the pool. This can tempt children to go for the toys later, increasing the risk of them falling in and drowning.
  • Barriers should be in place to keep children from entering the pool on their own. Alarms on doors and pool fences with self-closing gates also helps to keep kids safe.
  • Always keep a phone nearby so that you can call 911 in the case of an emergency.
  • Empty kiddie pools and turn them upside down when finished. Tragedies have happened in just a few inches of water.

Pool Safety 2
What swimming rules should I set for my children?

  • Only swim if an adult is a present.
  • Do not dive in shallow areas of the pool (or the entire pool if it is not deep enough for diving).
  • Don’t push or jump on others.
  • Don’t go swimming during thunder/lightning storms.

My kids have already taken swimming lessons, so I probably don’t need to watch them as much, right?

While we encourage swimming lessons, children should not be swimming alone even if they are good swimmers. It takes multiple lessons before a child learns how to swim effectively and even then, there should still be active supervision by an adult.

How do I rescue a child I think might be drowning?

  • Take the child out of the water
  • If you are alone, call 911 and begin CPR. Starting CPR immediately is the most important thing you can do to prevent a child from dying.
  • If you are not alone, begin CPR and ask someone to call 911.
  • Check for breathing and responsiveness. Place your ear near the child’s mouth and nose to see if you feel air on your cheek? Determine if the child’s chest is moving and call the child’s name to see if he or she responds.

Should I be CPR certified?

Anyone who routinely supervises children around water should get CPR certified. The certification courses are provided by many community organizations, including the American Red Cross.

It sounds like there is a lot to prepare for – can the water still be safe and fun for my family?

Absolutely! Swimming can be great family fun. Make sure you take the necessary precautions, always supervise swimming children and that someone in the family has taken CPR classes.

Visit our website for more safety tips and information.

 

 


Tucson Medical Center | 5301 E. Grant Road | Tucson, Arizona 85712 | (520) 327-5461