Have you talked with your primary care provider about your weight? National Obesity Care Week

TMC offers surgical and non surgical scientifically based programs to support you achieve a healthy weight. The American Medical Association in 2013 recognized obesity as a disease, and in doing so took critical steps towards supporting those affected to access science-based healthcare.

The misperceptions and stigma surrounding the causes of obesity often negatively affect an individual’s ability to access the care they need. The more than 90 million adult Americans affected by obesity are at increased risk for a variety of health conditions, including type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and sleep apnea.

Despite the significant health impacts of obesity, many of us struggle to talk with our primary care provider about our weight and how a science-based approach can help us to achieve a healthy weight.

Tucson Medical Center offers safe and effective weight-loss programs with both surgical and non-surgical options. We know everyone faces unique challenges to achieving a weight-loss goal. Our team of medical professionals can help you choose the path that’s right for you.

Weight-Loss Counseling Program

Our registered dietitians and exercise physiologists will work with you to create a personalized plan you can live with, so you can lose weight and keep it off. The 12-week program includes: • Nutrition, fitness and general wellness assessments • Reliable advice that you can use • Tracking of weight and estimated body composition • Development of personalized nutrition and fitness plans • Strategies to promote long-term weight-loss success

The program is individualized for you and so you can begin at any time. For more details, please contact TMC Wellness, (520) 324-4163 or Wellness@tmcaz.com.

Weight-Loss Surgery from the TMC Bariatric Center of Excellence

At the TMC Bariatric Center, we offer a comprehensive approach to help those who qualify for weight loss surgery. For most people to qualify you must:

  1. BMI ≥ 40, or more than 100 pounds overweight
  2. BMI ≥35 and at least one or more obesity-related co-morbidities such as type 2 diabetes, hypertension, sleep apnea and other respiratory disorders, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, osteoarthritis, lipid abnormalities, gastrointestinal disorders, or heart disease
  3. Inability to achieve a healthy weight loss sustained for a period of time with prior weight loss efforts

Our program guides you every step of the way on your weight-loss journey, starting with free seminars to discover if a surgical option is right for you; to pre-surgery counseling and evaluations; post-op care that includes nutritional counseling; psychological support; instruction on incorporated exercises into your lifestyle; and discussion groups where you can build relationships with others who have had bariatric surgery at TMC to help you achieve your goals.

 

The TMC Bariatric Center of Excellence is accredited as a comprehensive center by the Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation and Quality Improvement Program.

The American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS) Center of Excellence was started in 2004 to advance the safety and efficiency of bariatric and metabolic surgical care. Surgical Review Corporation administers the program on behalf of the ASMBS.

No matter what method you have used to lose weight, sticking to your new good habits and keeping the weight off can be a challenge. Don’t try to tackle it alone, talk to your primary care provider, talk to us, together we can take on the challenge of obesity and its complex nature and help you be a healthier you.

This week is National Obesity Care Week where the goal is to advance an evidence-based understanding of obesity and widespread access to respectful, comprehensive and appropriate care.

Temps are rising and the pool is beckoning – do you know your water safety?

Pool Safety 3Is it hot enough yet? With Tucson temperatures exceeding 115 degrees for three straight days, many families will be heading for the pool this weekend.

It’s no surprise why swimming is a summer favorite. Parents get a chance to cool-off, kids max out on fun and families make memories.

With the summertime exuberance of visiting, splashing and playing, it can be easy for all to forget important safety rules. This is serious because Arizona has the second highest number of child drownings in the United States.

Child drowning is tragic but preventable. Safe Kids Pima County Coordinator Jessica Mitchell works with community partners to provide helpful tips and education to prevent childhood drowning. She provided us important water safety standards every
parent should know.

It’s as easy as ABC

A = Adult supervision B = Barriers around pools, spas and hot tubs C = Coast Guard approved life vest and life-saving CPR classes

My kids love playing in the pool – what are the things to watch out for?

  • Active supervision is a must. Provide active supervision without any distractions – even if other adults are present and many kids are in the pool. They call drowning the “silent killer” because a drowning child can’t call for help.
  • Infants and toddlers should stay within an arm’s reach of an adult.
  • Don’t rely on swimming aids such as water wings and pool noodles. They are fun, but may not prevent drowning.
  • When finished, remove all toys from the pool. This can tempt children to go for the toys later, increasing the risk of them falling in and drowning.
  • Barriers should be in place to keep children from entering the pool on their own. Alarms on doors and pool fences with self-closing gates also helps to keep kids safe.
  • Always keep a phone nearby so that you can call 911 in the case of an emergency.
  • Empty kiddie pools and turn them upside down when finished. Tragedies have happened in just a few inches of water.

Pool Safety 2
What swimming rules should I set for my children?

  • Only swim if an adult is a present.
  • Do not dive in shallow areas of the pool (or the entire pool if it is not deep enough for diving).
  • Don’t push or jump on others.
  • Don’t go swimming during thunder/lightning storms.

My kids have already taken swimming lessons, so I probably don’t need to watch them as much, right?

While we encourage swimming lessons, children should not be swimming alone even if they are good swimmers. It takes multiple lessons before a child learns how to swim effectively and even then, there should still be active supervision by an adult.

How do I rescue a child I think might be drowning?

  • Take the child out of the water
  • If you are alone, call 911 and begin CPR. Starting CPR immediately is the most important thing you can do to prevent a child from dying.
  • If you are not alone, begin CPR and ask someone to call 911.
  • Check for breathing and responsiveness. Place your ear near the child’s mouth and nose to see if you feel air on your cheek? Determine if the child’s chest is moving and call the child’s name to see if he or she responds.

Should I be CPR certified?

Anyone who routinely supervises children around water should get CPR certified. The certification courses are provided by many community organizations, including the American Red Cross.

It sounds like there is a lot to prepare for – can the water still be safe and fun for my family?

Absolutely! Swimming can be great family fun. Make sure you take the necessary precautions, always supervise swimming children and that someone in the family has taken CPR classes.

Visit our website for more safety tips and information.

 

 

Rosemary Duschene: Bariatric surgery and hard work lead to a new life

RosemaryRosemary Duschene had grown weary of her diabetes – and along with it, her daily regimen of multiple pills, multiple shots and multiple complications.

“I happened to catch a commercial that said bariatric surgery improves the diabetic condition,” she said.  “I had been a diabetic for 25 years, and it was just becoming totally unbearable.”

With support from her physicians and loved ones, she underwent the surgery just over a year ago, and now reports her diabetic regimen is down to just one pill per day – with the hope that even that one last pill could become unnecessary.

“Within one year’s time I lost 65-70 pounds,” Duschene recalled, noting the lifestyle change was “really not so difficult!  TMC made certain everything was perfect before I became a candidate for surgery.”

After the bariatric surgery to assist her weight loss, she was quickly back on her feet and active. “I wasn’t used to sitting around, and now I had all this added energy and less weight to carry around, so it was easy to get up and move.”

She had a dog to walk, so that was a great motivator – but the biggest energy stimulus has to be Duschene’s 2-year-old grandson, always ready for a trip to the park.

“I let him run, and he chases me, and I chase him…I want so much to be a part of his life.  It’s hard to keep up with a 2-year-old, but it isn’t so bad any more!  I don’t get so tired. It’s just really great to feel so good.”


Tucson Medical Center | 5301 E. Grant Road | Tucson, Arizona 85712 | (520) 327-5461