Going above and beyond – Mission Moment

Rhonda Bodfield, right, leading a Zumba class at Armory Park during 2016 Beyond! commemoration events. Photo: A.E. Araiza

We all have that person in our office – that positive, first to volunteer, always going above and beyond, trying to make the day brighter for everyone, person – like Rhonda Bodfield, the director of Communications at TMC.

Bodfield is respected by her coworkers for her professionalism, strong work ethic and pleasant demeanor – no surprise; she takes it a step further, demonstrating TMC’s dedication at local events.

“She is one of our best and most active volunteers,” said Jessica Mitchell, program manager for outreach at TMC. “We see her at five to six TMC events throughout the year, from the Summer Safari Friday Nights to Be Safe Saturdays.”

If you have been to a TMC event or visited a TMC booth at a community event, then you’ve probably seen Bodfield helping fit a bike helmet for a child, handing out helpful information or discussing public health.

“It’s not just that she volunteers, but how she volunteers,” said Mitchell. “She really wants to help people and you can see that it’s rewarding to her – her participation inspires other TMC employees to volunteer too.”

The next time you are enjoying one of Tucson’s many, fun community events, stop by the TMC booth and say hello to Rhonda.

Mission Moment: TMC ICU staff give back to our community

TMC ICU Gospel volunteersWhen a number of nurses on staff in the Adult Critical Care Unit (ACCU) expressed to Clinical Nurse Specialist Angie Muzzy a desire to find a way to give back to our community, they had come to the right place.

“I said I know about a couple of great opportunities for us. One is the Gospel Rescue Mission Women and Children’s Shelter and the other is volunteering for a Habitat for Humanity build,” said Muzzy.

At the Gospel Rescue Mission, groups can purchase and bring in food and then cook a meal for the women and children staying at the shelter.

“It’s really a gift for us because it gave us the opportunity to be a part of this wonderful program and do something tangible for women and children that need a helping hand.”

A group of nine nurses and one pharmacist pooled their resources to plan, purchase and make a nice Italian meal for about 100 people. They bought 20 chickens from Costco, pasta, sauce, meatballs, salad, garlic bread … the works.

“When we asked what kind of food would be best, they said meat, any protein. And it was great because there was leftover chicken that the chef was able to use the next day for another meal,” said Muzzy.

She added of the experience, “It was just a nice way to spend an afternoon. You leave there feeling like you did something great.”

When Muzzy reached out to the folks at Habitat for Humanity they said they had ten open spots for the September build.

Overwhelmed by the response to participate, they were able to take a group of ten and had a waiting list of ten more.

The group plans to continue finding opportunities to get out in the community and volunteer at least twice a year.

Tucson Medical Center recently adopted a new mission statement. To celebrate, we are sharing a series of “mission moments” throughout the year.

What are mission moments? They aren’t necessarily dramatic stories of heroism, although our medical staff saves lives every day. These are moments that breathe life into words – moments that are profound or powerful or touching and that remind us why we do the work we do. Hundreds of these reminders happen every day. Thank you for letting us share some with you.

Mission Moment: Nurse helped organize drive to help family in darkest time

Jenna CarboneIt was hard for Jenna Carbone to imagine that a family would have to weather so many blows at a single time.

A young mother was making the wrenching decision to stop intervention for her husband, who had suffered cardiac arrest.

Their baby had come just two weeks before – she had been so pregnant that her elementary-school-aged son had to perform CPR when his dad collapsed, guided by a 911 dispatcher. The family had recently moved from California, so there were no friends or family to turn to for support. And money would be tight: the husband had been the traditional breadwinner while his wife took care of the kids.

A TMC Intensive Care Unit nurse, Carbone held the newborn for an entire shift to allow the mom and son some time to say goodbye. The Mom-Baby Unit supplied formula and diapers, and Child Life specialists helped the boy work through his grief and the long hours at the hospital.

While the staff was helping with the baby, they got to thinking about the upcoming school year. “Mom was making funeral plans and trying to adjust to a brand new baby in a brand new city. It just didn’t seem right she was having to do all of this by herself – who could put it all together on a good day? We couldn’t imagine she’d have the time or ability to go shop for school supplies,” Carbone explained.

And the boy was such an inspiration, she said. “You could tell he had faith. He would try to comfort others to tell them he would see his dad in Heaven someday and that it was better than having him suffer,” she recalled. Even as young as he was, he was trying to help hold the family together.

The power of teamwork was immediately clear to Carbone, who has been a nurse for six years.

Case Management called the school to get the list of items the boy would need. Within hours, staff from the Lab and Finance and clinical areas started bringing supplies – everything from a tablet for the boy, to diapers, baby bouncers and professional clothes for the mom for future job interviews.

Carbone filled up her hatchback and even though she couldn’t see out of the rear view mirror, set off to deliver the supplies to the family’s rural home.

Carbone said it was her honor to help – and thanked her colleagues across the hospital for their contributions. “We see some fragile situations sometimes and it’s really nice when you know there are things we can do to help and to try to bring comfort when people are going through difficult times. It’s an honor and a privilege to serve them and to help another person in need.”

What are mission moments? They aren’t necessarily dramatic stories of heroism, although our medical staff saves lives every day. These are moments that breathe life into words – moments that are profound or powerful or touching and that remind us why we do the work we doHundreds of these reminders happen every day. Thank you for letting us share some with you.

Mission Moment: Transporter warms hearts with simple gesture

Transporter Christina Ruebush living the mission by going beyond.
When a simple get-well card brought joy to a discouraged patient, a TMC employee decided to provide a thoughtful card to every patient she serves.

TMC patient transporter Christina Ruebush joined the ranks six months ago, after having an exceptional health care experience at TMC. “The staff were so polite and thoughtful that I knew this would be a great place to work.”

Ruebush’s fast-paced position takes her back-and-forth across TMC’s 100-acre campus, but she doesn’t mind. “I really enjoy the patient interaction,” she said. “Anytime I can be supportive or help in any way, I do.”

Not long ago, a patient motivated Ruebush to start doing something new. “I had transported an elderly man several times – each time he was very unhappy, grumpy and even mean.”

Ruebush thought about what might help. “So I went out and bought him a get-well card.”

When Ruebush was called to transport him again, she handed the card to the patient. Although Ruebush didn’t expect anything in return, she received a new understanding that would change her forever.

“The patient’s demeanor was completely different – he kindly thanked me over and over, and explained that he was alone, with no friends or family – he really just wanted someone to talk with.”

After enjoying a conversation with the patient, Ruebush stopped by the dollar store on the way home. “I decided that I was going to give every patient I transported a get-well card.”

For months, Ruebush has been providing every patient she transports with a card offering kind and sincere wishes. “It’s well worth the heartfelt thank yous and smiles I get,” she said.

This week, Ruebush is doing even more – she is providing each patient staying at TMC on Christmas Day with a get-well card.

“At TMC, we thrive on patient experience,” said Ruebush. “No matter what they are experiencing, patients appreciate knowing that TMC cares.”

Tucson Medical Center earlier this year adopted a new mission statement. To celebrate, we are sharing an ongoing series of “mission moments.”

What are mission moments? They aren’t necessarily dramatic stories of heroism, although our medical staff saves lives every day. These are moments that breathe life into words – moments that are profound or powerful or touching and that remind us why we do the work we do.

Hundreds of these reminders happen every day. Thank you for letting us share some with you.

Do you have a TMC mission moment you’d like to share? Send it to Communications@tmcaz.com


Tucson Medical Center | 5301 E. Grant Road | Tucson, Arizona 85712 | (520) 327-5461