Make summer snacks fun, tasty and healthy

Summer snack 3Summertime brings vacations, warm weather and great food. The TMC and TMCOne Clinical Dietician Kallie Siderewicz offers some tips to make summer food fun, tasty and healthy.

Healthy doesn’t mean boring

Try a peanut butter and low-fat Greek yogurt dip for fruit. Ranch seasoning also gives Greek yogurt the yum factor for dipping veggies.

Other fun dishes include fruit kabobs, apples slices topped with peanut butter, coconut, and chocolate chips. A summertime favorite is fruit coated with frozen yogurt.

Cool off by infusing water or tea with lemon, lime, berries, oranges, mint, or rosemary.

Summer snackFor an adult beverage, try light beer, a glass of red wine or liquor mixed with water or diet soda.

High-calorie pitfalls

Before hot summer days have you reaching for a frozen coffee drink – remember that a small serving can have over 500 calories. Sodas and most sports drinks offer hard-to-burn calories with no nutrition.

For adults, mixed drinks usually combine alcohol and sugar, piling calories on top of calories.

Fruit salads made with fruit canned in heavy syrup can have as many calories as pie and cake, especially if you add marshmallows and whipped cream.

Don’t forget water

Water is the absolute best thing you can give your body. It hydrates, helps cleanse and cool. Another good reason to drink water – it can aid in weight loss.

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Kallie Siderewicz is a clinical dietician at the TMCOne Rincon location. She also provides nutrition services at Tucson Medical Center.

Food-safe grilling and picnicking

Food grilling safety tipsFor heat-tolerant Arizonans, and for those visiting slightly cooler destinations, summer is a time for picnics and cookouts. Unfortunately, it can also be a prime time for foodborne illness (“food poisoning”) to hit. Although warm summer temperatures may make humans feel sluggish, bacteria are undeterred. In fact, most harmful bacteria reproduce faster at temperatures of 90° to 100° F. That’s a good reason to be cautious, but there’s no need to give up al fresco dining. You can still have an enjoyable outing by following a few simple food safety guidelines:

Food Safety Basics: Clean,  Separate, Cook, Chill

  1. Clean your hands and anything that is going to touch the food – cutting boards, utensils, cookware and other surfaces. The best cleanser is soap and warm water. However, if they are not available, you can use alcohol-based hand sanitizer on your hands. Wipe or rinse off any dirt or grease before applying the hand sanitizer, so it can work better. If you are heading outdoors, bring clean utensils and other items with you. Be sure to pack everything into clean coolers, baskets and bags.
  2. Separate raw meat, poultry, fish or eggs from ready-to-eat foods. Raw meat, etc., should be wrapped in its own container and carried in a separate cooler filled with ice. Once a raw item is cooked, do not put it back into the same container, which may still be contaminated with germs.
  3. Cook that raw meat, poultry, fish and eggs to a safe internal temperature. You cannot rely on color to tell you whether or not the food is safe. Use a food thermometer, and go to www.fightbac.org/cook-1 to find a chart of safe temperatures for various foods.
  4. Chill perishable food at 40° F or below until you are ready to cook or eat it. When transporting food, carry it in the air-conditioned section of the car, not in the trunk. If you are working with frozen foods, do not defrost them at room temperature. At the end of the meal, chill leftovers as soon as possible. It is normally recommended to put leftovers in the refrigerator within 2 hours. However, if the ambient temperature is above 90° F, you only have 1 hour to get them chilled. If you are picnicking or camping, it would be wise to discard the perishable leftovers rather than risk a foodborne illness.

Healthier Grilling

Cooking meat, poultry or fish at a high temperature – as in pan frying or direct grilling – can create carcinogenic (cancer-causing) compounds. There are steps you can take to minimize the amount of dangerous compounds in your food.

  1. Choose lean cuts of meat and poultry, and cut off visible fat before cooking. Another option is to choose fish or vegetables instead. Less fat produces fewer toxins.
  2. Marinate food before cooking it.
  3. Cook at a lower temperature. If using a gas grill, don’t set it on high. With conventional grills, use hardwood charcoal, which burns at a lower temperature than softer woods like mesquite. Flipping the food frequently will also keep the surface temperature cooler.
  4. Cook indirectly rather than setting food directly over the flame or coals.
  5. Do not eat charred food. Cajun food blackened with spices is not a problem. Food blackened by overcooking or burning is.

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Temps are rising and the pool is beckoning – do you know your water safety?

Pool Safety 3Is it hot enough yet? With Tucson temperatures exceeding 115 degrees for three straight days, many families will be heading for the pool this weekend.

It’s no surprise why swimming is a summer favorite. Parents get a chance to cool-off, kids max out on fun and families make memories.

With the summertime exuberance of visiting, splashing and playing, it can be easy for all to forget important safety rules. This is serious because Arizona has the second highest number of child drownings in the United States.

Child drowning is tragic but preventable. Safe Kids Pima County Coordinator Jessica Mitchell works with community partners to provide helpful tips and education to prevent childhood drowning. She provided us important water safety standards every
parent should know.

It’s as easy as ABC

A = Adult supervision B = Barriers around pools, spas and hot tubs C = Coast Guard approved life vest and life-saving CPR classes

My kids love playing in the pool – what are the things to watch out for?

  • Active supervision is a must. Provide active supervision without any distractions – even if other adults are present and many kids are in the pool. They call drowning the “silent killer” because a drowning child can’t call for help.
  • Infants and toddlers should stay within an arm’s reach of an adult.
  • Don’t rely on swimming aids such as water wings and pool noodles. They are fun, but may not prevent drowning.
  • When finished, remove all toys from the pool. This can tempt children to go for the toys later, increasing the risk of them falling in and drowning.
  • Barriers should be in place to keep children from entering the pool on their own. Alarms on doors and pool fences with self-closing gates also helps to keep kids safe.
  • Always keep a phone nearby so that you can call 911 in the case of an emergency.
  • Empty kiddie pools and turn them upside down when finished. Tragedies have happened in just a few inches of water.

Pool Safety 2
What swimming rules should I set for my children?

  • Only swim if an adult is a present.
  • Do not dive in shallow areas of the pool (or the entire pool if it is not deep enough for diving).
  • Don’t push or jump on others.
  • Don’t go swimming during thunder/lightning storms.

My kids have already taken swimming lessons, so I probably don’t need to watch them as much, right?

While we encourage swimming lessons, children should not be swimming alone even if they are good swimmers. It takes multiple lessons before a child learns how to swim effectively and even then, there should still be active supervision by an adult.

How do I rescue a child I think might be drowning?

  • Take the child out of the water
  • If you are alone, call 911 and begin CPR. Starting CPR immediately is the most important thing you can do to prevent a child from dying.
  • If you are not alone, begin CPR and ask someone to call 911.
  • Check for breathing and responsiveness. Place your ear near the child’s mouth and nose to see if you feel air on your cheek? Determine if the child’s chest is moving and call the child’s name to see if he or she responds.

Should I be CPR certified?

Anyone who routinely supervises children around water should get CPR certified. The certification courses are provided by many community organizations, including the American Red Cross.

It sounds like there is a lot to prepare for – can the water still be safe and fun for my family?

Absolutely! Swimming can be great family fun. Make sure you take the necessary precautions, always supervise swimming children and that someone in the family has taken CPR classes.

Visit our website for more safety tips and information.

 

 

Surviving the summer sizzle with the TMC Security team

Security_Services_SealsTMC Security Services and the Crime Prevention K9 Unit are dedicated to maintaining a safe community in Southern Arizona.  Officers provide the following useful safety information to help you and your family stay safe this summer.

Monsoon driving safety tips

If you’ve lived in Tucson for any length of time, you know the drill.  In the late afternoon, dark clouds fill the sky, and the town can be soaked in a matter of minutes.  Washes and roadways can resemble small rivers, creating dangerous driving conditions.

      ▪  Never try to cross flooded roads.  Even shallow running water exerts 
         great pressure and can sweep your car off the road or stall your engine.  
         Under the Arizona “Stupid Motorist Law,” a driver requiring rescue 
         from a flooded wash with posted warning signs or gates may be held 
         responsible for the cost of the water rescue.  These drivers may be cited
         by law enforcement for numerous charges depending on the incident.

     ▪  If you’re driving and a find your visibility limited due to heavy rain or 
         blowing dust, do the following:
          ∙  Pull off to the right side as far as possible. 
          ∙  Turn off your engine and lights.
          ∙  Stay inside your vehicle.
          ∙  Keep your foot off the brake pedal.  Drivers may see your lights and 
              assume you are on the road in motion.
          ∙  If you approach an intersection with a non-functional traffic signal,
              treat it as a four-way stop.
          ∙  Listen to your car radio for the latest traffic and weather conditions. 

Summer safety in vehicles

The TMC Security team encourages people to use extreme caution during the summer’s extreme heat.  When temperatures outside reach 100 degrees, the temperature inside a car can reach 138 degrees in five minutes!  Within 15 minutes, it can reach 150 degrees, even with a window partially open.

In these conditions, children and pets can die in a matter of minutes. Infants and small children are particularly vulnerable; the younger the child, the faster the onset of heat stroke and dehydration.  In 2012, at least 37 heatstroke deaths of children in vehicles were reported nationwide.  So far this year, 21 children have died in hot vehicles.  Follow this advice to make sure your loved ones don’t succumb to the summer sizzle.

     ▪  Children
          ∙  Simply do not leave kids in the car.
          ∙  Secure your car keys so children don’t have access to them.
          ∙  Warn your children about playing in the car by themselves without
             adult supervision.
          ∙  Get your kids out of the car first, and then worry about bringing in
              groceries, etc.
          ∙  Ask your child’s day care provider about their plan to make sure kids
             are not left in the provider’s car or van.

     ▪  Pets
          ∙  Never take your dog with you to run errands in which you plan on
             leaving him/her in the car – even for a few minutes.

Cracking down on summer crime with the TMC Security team

Security_Services_Seals

TMC Security Services and the Crime Prevention K9 Unit are dedicated to maintaining a safe community in Southern Arizona.  Officers provide the following useful safety information to help you and your family avoid becoming victims of crime this summer.

Vacation Safety

Don’t let your summer vacation turn stressful by becoming a victim of criminals who like to prey on unsuspecting vacationers!

     Before you leave:
          ▪  Schedule a friend or neighbor to pick up mail and/or deliveries.
          ▪  Make your house look “lived in.”  Use timers to run lights and a radio
             on and off during expected hours.
         ▪  Make a photocopy of all your credit cards before you leave home so
             that you have a record of the card numbers in the event your credit
             cards are lost or stolen.
          ▪  Program the phone number to your bank and credit card company
              into your cell phone in the event your checks or credit cards are lost
              or stolen. 
          ▪  Avoid posting anything on social media about your plans to leave
             town.
     On the road:
          ▪  Always lock valuables out of sight.  Carry wallets, checkbooks and 
             purses with you.
          ▪  Do not advertise that you are a tourist.  Place maps and travel
              brochures in the glove compartment.
     At the hotel:
          ▪  Take a few minutes and locate the fire escape that is closest to your
              room.
          ▪  Use all auxiliary locking devices on doors and windows when
              occupying or leaving your room.
          ▪  When unpacking your things, arrange them so that you’ll know if
              anything turns up missing.
          ▪  Close up and lock your suitcases whenever you leave so that they
              cannot be used to carry property out of your room.
          ▪  Don’t hesitate to report any suspicious persons or activities to hotel
              management and the police.

Summer safety for children

The summer is a time when parents should remind their children about all things safety.  It’s also a time when children are often left home alone while parents work.  Empowering your child with the knowledge of what to do in certain situations will give you both peace of mind.

     ▪  Participate in TMC’s Children’s Identification Program.  A
         fingerprint/identification card allows parents to collect specific 
         information by easily recording the physical characteristics and 
         fingerprints of their children.  Please call (520) 324-5397 for more
         information.
     ▪  Make sure children know their full name, address and telephone
         number.  Make sure they know their parents’ names too.
     ▪  When children are home alone, make sure they know to keep the door
         locked and closed for everyone.  Inform them to let the phone ring if
         someone calls, and to call 911 if they hear or notice anything suspicious.

Suspicious people

Suspicious behavior is difficult to define, but the key here is to trust your gut.  If something seems out of place, is not quite right, or just raises a red flag in your mind, report it immediately.  “See something, say something.”  If you see a suspicious person, do your best to note the following:

  ▪  What they are wearing.
  ▪  What they look like (height, build, hair color, skin complexion, etc.).
  ▪  Where they are.
  ▪  The direction they are heading if they are moving.
  ▪  What they are doing.
  ▪  Any vehicles they are using (type, color and license plate number if possible).


Tucson Medical Center | 5301 E. Grant Road | Tucson, Arizona 85712 | (520) 327-5461